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20130222
20130222
STATION
KQED (PBS) 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Feb 22, 2013 6:30pm EST
and affordability will help propel the housing market. >> tom: what about over in china with the consumer there who is kind of been pushed and pulled between stim lutz and pulling back the stimulus from beijing? >> that is an area that we do like. besides the long-term secular growth of rising wealth in china, we also now have a new leadership in place in china and that's given more confidence to the chinese consumer, and we think we're going to see continued growth in that parent of the global economy. >> tom: you've described this as a barbell approach. on one end the united states, on the other end you like china. that's leading you to technology. xlk is the ticker symbol. why do you like technology if you like the u.s. and china together? >> well, we like the technol sector for a number of reasons. first we do think you're going to see a pickup in global growth. tech companies are very linked to the global economy. a lot of the technology companies rely on corporate capital spend. so that's where we think we'll seen inflection point there. valuations for the tech sector are the lowest they've b
PBS
Feb 21, 2013 4:30pm PST
china dumps tires or other products on the u.s. market, it's pretty clear how to respond: raise tariffs and slap penalties on the producers. but how do you punish a chinese company that is suspected of receiving trade secrets through a government operation the government of china refuses to acknowledge? >> how you sanction a country with regards to cyber-espionage? i think we are still writing the book on that. it's a brand new area of exploration and i don't think policy makers really have the definitive word on how this will be accomplished. >> reporter: a new report says shanghai is home base for a massive chinese hacking effort that may involve thousands of people, but the u.s. and most other countries also employee secret armies of programmers engaged in some form of cyber- espionage. and that makes it harder to define a diplomatic solution to the problem. >> a lot of the most important military information in the world is on weapons systems that are developed by private corporations whether in this country or other countries around the world. so drawing those lines is not easy. >>
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)